Monthly Archives: April 2012

Modern Tech in Publishing Final Project 2010/Pace MS In Publishing

Modern Tech Final Project (Slideshare Presentation)

It’s amazing what you can store in the cloud.  This was our modern tech project in the Spring of 2010.

Enjoy!

 

Don

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School Days

I have been remiss in keeping blog posts going.  I am currently finishing my Masters in Publishing Science through Pace University in New York.  I am finishing a program completely online.  I started this process back in 2009, and after a good amount of hard work, I graduate and get to walk on the stage at Radio City Music Hall (yes– THAT Radio City Music Hall!) on May 16, 2012.

My first visit to Radio City Music Hall was in 1964 or 65.  I went with my mother and sister to see Mary Poppins with Julie Andrews in the title role.  I had a Little League Baseball hat that I loved to wear all the time, and I forgot it and left it in the seat when I left.  I wonder if Radio City has a Lost and Found and would still have my hat?

Once school ends next month, the blog posts on publishing will be flowing!  Sit tight and hold on, because this is going to be the place where helpful discussions will abound!

If any of you are graduating in the class of 2012, I congratulate you on your hard work and wish you love, luck and happiness in your future pursuits!

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Looking at the I-Pad From Two Angles- by David Pogue

Again, the post still has merit as the new Ipad-3 has just hit the Apple stores.

The article I have chosen to write on was in the New York Times on March 31, 2010.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/01/technology/personaltech/01pogue.html?pagewanted=1&hp

This article was an interesting piece of journalism that used both angles to rate the properties of a device that has yet to hit the public market.  Although we have not spoken directly about the individual e-readers in class, we have discussed the dissemination of information that is heading our way based on what the individual readers have to offer in the way of Apps, Bells and virtual Whistles.  The I-pad has been listed as a game-changer in the way digital e-products are downloaded and viewed, and also a new Agency Model with publishers that may give Amazon a run for the downloadable dollar.

The Techie Side 

Pogue begins his article by laying out the tech side of rating this new reader.  He has scoured the net of techies and has seen quotes like, “This device is laughably absurd,”1

With an even more ominous, “How can they expect anyone to get serious computer work done without a mouse?”2 The insinuation is that the I-pad can be a serious contender as a portable computing device, but not at the level most techies would anticipate.

The article moves forward at the rate of a symphonic masterpiece.  Slowly, ever slowly the case is built against the I-Pad, “The Apple I-Pad is basically a gigantic iPod Touch.”3 With this opening shot fired across the bow, the reader is left scratching their head and wondering if they should continue further into the article, as the case has been made for functionality that is duplicated on a lesser device that is already in the marketplace for a much smaller outlay of cash funds.  This brings to mind all of the accounting from our class as we know for personal or corporate liquidity that cash flow is king and without cash flow you have no ability to have any purchasing power whatsoever.  As Yogi Berra has said, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!” With mea culpa’s to Yogi, the new mantra might be termed “If it’s more expensive, why buy it”

Another annoying problem that Pogue has pointed out is visible after you are operating the device.  “When the very glossy 9.7-inch screen is off, every fingerprint is grossly apparent.”4 Although I am not all that worried about fingerprints on my screen, I guess some people are and this could impact the number of techi’s willing to shell out the money to purchase this new device.  Again, the cash flow issue rears its ugly head and low or no sales will be at the detriment of Apple having a big payday with this new device on the shelves.

“It’s one app at a time, just like on the iPhone. Plus no U.S.B. jacks and no camera. …You know Apple is just leaving stuff out for next year’s model.”5 This has been my contention all along, the I-pad has its drawbacks, but it is an Apple product and as such will open the door to new e-reading customers who will get hooked on this new device.  The next model will be the one where Apple swings for the fences and knocks one clean out of the park.  Techi’s may take note of this fact and stay on the sidelines awaiting the Swiss Army Knife of readers that will appear at the end of 2011 or 2012.

Review for Everyone

This second part of the review was basically a cheerleader’s edition of why you should go out and buy the I-pad right when it hits the store.  “The simple act of making the multitouch screen bigger changes the whole experience.”6 A larger version of the I-pod touch is just what everyone needed and the myriad of ways this experience will be the best experience are decried in an overall homage to Apple and their engineers.  Everything the I-pod touch can do, the I-pad can do bigger and better. “The new iBooks e-reader app is filled with endearing grace notes. For example, when you turn a page, the animated page edge actually follows your finger’s position and speed as it curls, just like a paper page. Font, size and brightness controls appear when you tap.”7

Some of the plus factors that will help the I-pad in the field are the fact that it is a light machine as well as being a fast and easy to operate machine.  Another all important piece of the puzzle is battery life.  The I-pad lasted 2 hours longer than the prescribed 10 hours of battery-life in the NY Times reporter’s independent testing.  The battery life issue may be enough to sway many consumers to the side of this brand new reader.

Pogue leaves the reader with a few observations:

“And the techies are right about another thing: the iPad is not a laptop. It’s not nearly as good for creating stuff. On the other hand, it’s infinitely more convenient for consuming it — books, music, video, photos, Web, e-mail and so on. For most people, manipulating these digital materials directly by touching them is a completely new experience — and a deeply satisfying one.”8

The final thought will make or break the sales of this product.  “Do you like the Concept?”9

References 

1-9  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/01/technology/personaltech/01pogue.html?pagewanted=1&hp

 

 

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